Cold Cassette 14
Maxell UR, 90 Minutes 
Side One
Elton John: Tiny Dancer Paul McCartney: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey Pink Floyd: Wish You Were Here The Eagles: Witchy Woman The Beatles: Revolution Grand Funk Railroad: Closer to Home Emerson Lake & Palmer: Lucky Man Crosby Still & Nash: Wooden Ships The Beatles: I’ve Just Seen a Face
Side Two
Jethro Tull: Cross-Eyed Mary The Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever The Strawberry Alarm Clock: Incense & Peppermints Steely Dan: Night By Night Greg Lake: Lucky Man (Live) Peter Gabriel: Solsbury Hill  Dire Straits: Walk of Life The Band: The Weight The Doors: The End Jimi Hendrix: Angel
Notes
I haven’t done a Cold Cassette since January, mostly because I kept putting off getting my scanner working again, but Nate Patrin's recent Buzz Feed article on mixtapes made me want to get back to it.

I don’t really consider these tapes I made off the radio mixtapes. A mixtape to me implies thought and consideration. The selection process is yours, whereas the selection process for these tapes was out of my hands. I had to take what the radio gave me in the order it gave it. 

You can see that at work here. There are two versions of ELP’s “Lucky Man” on this cassette, one the original studio version, the other a solo live take by Greg Lake.  The Beatles pop up three times—this tape was made at a time when I firmly preferred the band’s psychedelic/proto-prog era, but I think of the three songs on this tape, the one I like listening to most now is “I’ve Just Seen a Face,” which is a really beautiful piece of pop songwriting. 

What I really love about looking at this tape—and listening to it—is how unembarrassed this version of myself was to gather anything that sounded good to him. In college, I pulled back from a lot of this music in a self-conscious attempt to guide my taste down a hipper path, and at this point I find that more embarrassing than anything I ever liked in high school. These days, I’m well past the point where I have the mental energy to feel guilty about any particular pleasure.  

Cold Cassette 14

Maxell UR, 90 Minutes 

Side One

Elton John: Tiny Dancer
Paul McCartney: Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
Pink Floyd: Wish You Were Here
The Eagles: Witchy Woman
The Beatles: Revolution
Grand Funk Railroad: Closer to Home
Emerson Lake & Palmer: Lucky Man
Crosby Still & Nash: Wooden Ships
The Beatles: I’ve Just Seen a Face

Side Two

Jethro Tull: Cross-Eyed Mary
The Beatles: Strawberry Fields Forever
The Strawberry Alarm Clock: Incense & Peppermints
Steely Dan: Night By Night
Greg Lake: Lucky Man (Live)
Peter Gabriel: Solsbury Hill 
Dire Straits: Walk of Life
The Band: The Weight
The Doors: The End
Jimi Hendrix: Angel

Notes

I haven’t done a Cold Cassette since January, mostly because I kept putting off getting my scanner working again, but Nate Patrin's recent Buzz Feed article on mixtapes made me want to get back to it.

I don’t really consider these tapes I made off the radio mixtapes. A mixtape to me implies thought and consideration. The selection process is yours, whereas the selection process for these tapes was out of my hands. I had to take what the radio gave me in the order it gave it. 

You can see that at work here. There are two versions of ELP’s “Lucky Man” on this cassette, one the original studio version, the other a solo live take by Greg Lake.  The Beatles pop up three times—this tape was made at a time when I firmly preferred the band’s psychedelic/proto-prog era, but I think of the three songs on this tape, the one I like listening to most now is “I’ve Just Seen a Face,” which is a really beautiful piece of pop songwriting. 

What I really love about looking at this tape—and listening to it—is how unembarrassed this version of myself was to gather anything that sounded good to him. In college, I pulled back from a lot of this music in a self-conscious attempt to guide my taste down a hipper path, and at this point I find that more embarrassing than anything I ever liked in high school. These days, I’m well past the point where I have the mental energy to feel guilty about any particular pleasure.